2/6/2012 Tallahassee, Fla. – Governor Rick Scott and Lt. Governor Jennifer Carroll today released the following statements regarding Black History Month:

Statement from Governor Scott:

“During February, our nation takes time to reflect on the ways our communities, culture and history have been enriched by the achievements of Americans of African and Caribbean descent. In Florida, Lt. Governor Carroll and I have chosen to highlight African and Caribbean-Americans who have advanced science and technology – as well as our communities, culture and history – as part of our Black History Month celebration this year.

“Together, Lt. Governor Carroll and I are committed to making sure every student receives a superior education. By increasing opportunities in the STEM areas of science, technology, engineering and math, Florida’s students will be prepared to enter our globally competitive workforce.

“I am proud to have Jennifer Carroll by my side as Florida’s first Caribbean-American Lt. Governor. She also serves as the Chair of Space Florida and works to strengthen our state’s global aerospace enterprise. Her achievements include serving as a state legislator, former executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs and a 20-year Navy veteran, as well as being a small business owner.

“As we work to position Florida as the best place for businesses to expand and grow, the Lt. Governor and I are working to make Florida a place where the American dream of economic prosperity is possible for everyone.”

Statement from Lt. Governor Carroll:

“During the month of February, we pause to highlight and recognize Americans of African and Caribbean descent who have made significant sacrifices and contributions for our state, our country and the overall betterment of mankind. During this time, the familiar names of Rosa Parks or Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. often come to mind. While their legacies were important to building our nation, many others have also made an indelible mark on America.

“Lesser known leaders include many who advanced science and technology. Otis Boykin’s improved electrical resistor was used in the invention of the pacemaker. Dr. Mark Dean, who received a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Florida Atlantic University before earning a doctorate from Stanford, was instrumental in inventing the personal computer. Valerie Thomas managed the development of NASA’s image-processing systems for “Landsat,” the first satellite to send images from outer space.

“To ensure Florida’s future leaders continue advancing science and technology – as well as our communities, culture and history – the Governor and I are committed to making sure every student receives a superior education. By increasing opportunities in the STEM areas of science, technology, engineering and math, all of Florida’s students will be prepared to enter our globally competitive workforce.”

For more information about Florida’s Black History Month celebration, visit www.floridablackhistory.com.

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Black History Month Proclamation

 

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